Music

Raves Equal Death By Drugs, Says L.A. Times: Electric Daisy Carnival Promoter Fights Back

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Cody Black

Cody Black

An investigative report by the L.A. Times highlighting the connection between large-scale raves (specifically those promoted by event firms Go Ventures and Insomniac) and a series of drug-related deaths has sparked Insomniac founder Pasquale Rotella to launch an online call to action against the newspaper’s claims.

The story details 14 drug-related deaths that have occurred at Insomniac and Go Ventures events since 2006.

“As part of their mission to twist facts to suit their sensational story, the L.A. Times treated the opinions of a few people as gospel, turned everyone who enjoys electronic music events into villains, and ignored anyone that did not agree with their biased opinion,” reads the letter Rotella posted to his Instagram account in response to the front-page story.

“Rather than addressing the real issue, rampant drug use in the United States, Rong-Gong “Ron” Lin II and his team preferred to attack our company, our events, our music and Pasquale instead of doing any credible research on health and safety issues facing large music festivals across the world,” the letter added.

Rotella went on to ask fans to “voice your perspective to these reporters,” providing the email addresses and Twitter handles for the story’s trio of authors.

Prominent and outspoken DJ/producer Tommie Sunshine was quick to support the call to action, taking to his Twitter account to voice his extreme displeasure with the L.A. Times piece.

“Every person who loves this music & loves these parties better start getting off their asses & start speaking up,” Sunshine tweeted. “It’s a shame that the L.A. Times calls itself news when in reality it’s just one step shy of the National Enquirer and Star (magazine).”

Electric Daisy Carnival, Insomniac’s premiere event, moved from Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum and the adjacent Sports Arena to Las Vegas after controversy was sparked when a 15-year-old girl died of a drug overdose at the show’s 2010 edition, which attracted more than 185,000 attendees over two days. The girl’s family received $190,000 in a settlement after filing a lawsuit against Insomniac Inc. and the Coliseum for personal injuries and wrongful death.

-Scott T. Sterling, CBS Local

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