Beastie Boys Sued For Sampling Day Before Adam Yauch’s Passing, Sell More Records

View Comments
(Photo by Kiyoshi Ota/Getty Images)

(Photo by Kiyoshi Ota/Getty Images)

In a tragic case of awful timing, The Hollywood Reporter is reporting that just a day before Adam “MCA” Yauch’s passing, the Beastie Boys and their music publishers and record group–including Universal music, Brooklyn Dust Music, and Capitol Records–were federally sued by a company called TufAmerica because of an “alleged unauthorized use of copyrighted music” on 1986’s Licensed to Ill and 1989’s Paul’s Boutique.

TufAmerica is alleging that the Beastie Boys “purposely concealing the integration” of samples in Trouble Funk’s “Say What” in the Beastie Boys’ “Shadrach” and Trouble Funk’s “Drop The Bomb” in the Beastie Boys’ “Hold It Now Hit It” and “The New Style.”

Their copyright claim for infringement, unjust enrichment, and misappropriation comes over two decades since both of the albums releases and TufAmerica may have a “tough” time getting past the a statute of limitations.

This news come at a time when the whole world is mourning the loss of Yauch’s death and reliving their Beastie Boys memories by purchasing 1,235% more Beastie Boys music including the aforementioned Licensed to Ill.


According to Billboard, Beastie Boys’ 1986 album Licensed to Ill was the first rap album to be at Number 1 on the Billboard charts started March 7, 1987 and the album spent seven weeks at that spot.

Currently, Licensed to Ill is at Number 18 on the Billboard Top 200 with 19,000 units sold which is a sales increase of 802%.

Their entire catalog of songs and albums is up 1,235%, selling 55,000 this week compared to 4,000 last week before Yauch’s passing. Billboard estimates sale will increase even more in the next few weeks.

-Nadia Noir, CBS Radio Los Angeles

View Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 5,981 other followers